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Undergraduate Courses

Courses in the curriculum of the Cinema Studies Institute encourage a thorough examination of the cinema, as students receive a grounding in film study in its aesthetic, technological, economic, and sociocultural dimensions. Core courses focus on film analysis and the integration of film history and theory. Advanced courses allow for more in-depth examination of particular topics, ranging from specific filmmakers and genres to how cinema engages with different cultures, spectators, and nation-states.

Cinema Studies courses (Groups A through F) offered in the 2018-2019 academic year are listed below. Links to their timetable information will be added when that information is confirmed. For a complete course list, including those not being offered in 2018-2019, please refer to the Faculty of Arts & Science Calendar.

Cross-Listed courses: (Group G) offered in 2018-2019 can also be found below. Consult the respective department for days, times and locations.

Where applicable, prerequisites and restrictions are listed after each course description.

 

2018 Summer Session

Summer course enrolment has already begun.
Y courses: May 7 - August 14
F courses: May 15 - June 15
F exam period: June 20 - 26
S courses: July 3 - August 13
Y/S exam period: August 16-22

Please check the Faculty of Arts & Science for further information.

 

CIN105Y1Y - Introduction to Film Study

Introduction to film analysis; concepts of film style and narrative. Topics include: documentary, avant-garde, genres, authorship, ideology, and representation.

Instructor: Benjamin Wright
Day & Time: Monday and Wednesday, 12pm - 4pm
Location: Media Commons Theatre

Group A: Foundations
Exclusion: INI115Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN240H1F - The War Film

Screen representations of war play a significant role in shaping the social unconscious because they reveal the multifaceted nature of military conflict. This course examines this phenomenon in specific political and cultural contexts, focusing, in particular on the combat film genre’s narrative and conceptual components. The goal of the course is to investigate how changes in military/combat (the “Revolution in Military Affairs” hypothesis) have paralleled developments in the war film genre. In assessing these transformations, we will be viewing both international and Hollywood films, dating from the World War I to the ongoing War on Terror, that depict how the first tanks, poison gas and pilotless drones transformed into the “bloodless” war at a distance. In the process, we will investigate what is at stake in personal narratives that convey the combat experience and analyze how war films reflect attitudes toward war, military and casualties, by touching upon such issues as heroism, trauma, patriotism, racism and masculinity.

Instructor: Magda Yuksel
Day & Time: Tuesday and Thursday, 12pm - 4pm
Location: IN-222

Group C: Social and Cultural Practices
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 3. Society and its Institutions

 

CIN340H1S - The Media Event: Celebration, Accident, and Catastrophe

What is an event? Although this concept has become of central interest to contemporary philosophy and theory, it remains elusive. What is certain is that media play an important role in how we understand events. This course will look at how the event has been understood in terms of television, documentary and narrative, and will put these notions into conversation with theories of the event coming from philosophy. We will look at how certain types of events (such as plane crashes and accidents), and specific events (such as 9/11) have been approached both in media and in theory.

Instructor: Daniel McFadden
Day & Time: Tuesday and Thursday 5pm-9pm
Location: IN-222

Group D: Theory and Criticism
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN352H1F - Issues in Film Authorship I: The Cinécriture of Agnès Varda

This course will examine the controversial topic of authorship in the field of cinema studies by exploring the key critical issues and debates in the conceptual development of auteurism in film scholarship from the 1950s to the present. Beginning with the prominence of auteur-oriented film criticism and the emergence of the “film author” in the post-war period, our discussion will investigate the increasingly ambivalent status of this “authorial figure” by following its increasing displacement in structuralist and post-structuralist theory before studying its recent mutations engendered within (post-)feminist, transnational, and new media contexts. Over the course of this journey, we will navigate this contested terrain of conflicting authorial models and approaches not simply to evaluate the major challenges to the concept of the auteur as the sovereign source and unifying agent of a film text, but also to attain new strategies and methods for rethinking the (un)viability of auteurismfor the future of the discipline.

In order to deepen our thinking on the politics of film authorship, our itinerary will be fortified by Agnès Varda’s eclectic cinematic oeuvre which will serve to complicate and contextualize our discussions around the slippery concept of the film author. An enigmatic figure in her own right, Varda’s long and multifaceted career defies easy classification; her notable associations with the French New Wave and Left Bank Group, feminist aesthetics and politics, international activism, and an ever-evolving interdisciplinary artistic practice evince the difficulty involved in attempting to neatly position her complex body of work within any clearly defined cinematic category or context. For this reason, the “slippages” in Varda’s cinema and its historical, social and political dimensions will be explored to flesh out the elusive figure of the auteur and renegotiate the parameters of the ongoing debates around film authorship.  

Instructor: Nick Fernandes
Day & Time: Monday and Wednesday, 12pm - 4pm
Location: IN-222

Group C: Social and Cultural Practices
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations
 

CIN370H1S - Canadian Cinemas: English Narrative Films

This course will be an introduction to some of the major works from English-language Canadian film history. The historiographical nature of the course will provide a chronology of the major developments in English Canadian cinema (in distinction to Québécois cinema, which deserves a course all on its own) with a focus on Toronto filmmaking. Organized chronologically, each week there will be a study of specific films representative of different trends and movements. The key research question for the course would be to define what is characteristically ‘national’ about these works while also exploring the richness and diversity of the films. The types of films that will be covered include primarily full-length feature narrative films from Toronto but will diverge when necessary to best contextualize larger developments in Canadian film history. 

Instructor: David Davidson
Day & Time: Monday and Wednesday 12pm-4pm
Location: IN-222

Group D: Theory and Criticism
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN376Y0Y - Chinese Cinemas (China: Hong King)

To register, please see the Summer Abroad program.

In this course we study Chinese films from Hong Kong, the People’s Republic of China (PRC) and Taiwan. The course focuses on films produced since 1980. Chinese films share roots in the Shanghai cinema of the 1930s but, after the Second World War, Chinese cinema fragmented. Global admiration for Chinese films rose sharply in the 1980s as “new waves” appeared in Hong Kong, the PRC and Taiwan simultaneously. This course concentrates on that era of achievement. Films include works by Chen Kaige, Zhang Yimou, John Woo, Ann Hui, Feng Xiaogang, Stanley Kwan, Hou Hsaoi-hsien, Edward Yang and Wong Kar-wai.

Instructor: Bart Testa
Group E: History and Nation
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations


CIN378Y0Y - British Screen Cultures: Exploring Difference

To register, please see the Summer Abroad program.

This course offers a critical study of British film and visual cultures, with an emphasis on films that explore “difference” from the 1960s to the present day, although earlier representative works, including early British colonial films and the British documentary movement, will provide a foundational base for a comparative study of contemporary British cinema. Major and minor film cultures will be studied in their institutional and social contexts, including the long-standing tradition of British realism; the Free Cinema Movement; the “New Wave;” “Swinging London;” “Thatcherite” cinema, including its heritage, art cinema, Brit grit and Black British iterations; and the recent “lad boy” underclass cycle that reconfigures the traditional conceptualization of British cinema in the strict oppositional terms of “realism or tinsel.”

Case studies of select Black British filmmakers who have extended their practice into an art gallery context will offer the opportunity to explore more expanded considerations of British screen culture. Debates pertinent to the way in which British cinema relates to an evolving sense of identity, toward debating the “Englishness” of British screen culture, will be highlighted. To this end, we will focus on how “difference” functions in British cinema, with an emphasis on questions of race, class, gender and sexuality. Not eligible for CR/ NCR option.

Instructor: Kass Banning
Group E: History and Nation
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

 

2018 -2019 Fall - Winter Session

Course enrolment begins in July 2018.

 

Group A Courses: Foundations
 

CIN105Y1Y - Introduction to Film Study

Introduction to film analysis; concepts of film style and narrative. Topics include: documentary, avant-garde, genres, authorship, ideology, and representation.

Instructor: Benjamin Wright
Exclusion: INI115Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN201Y1Y - Film Cultures I: Art and Industry

Emergence of cinema from its start until the studio system in the first half of the 20th Century. Examines the practices, theories, and debates.

Instructor: Brian Jacobson
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Exclusion: INI212Y1, INI215Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations, 2. Thought, Belief and Behaviour

 

CIN301Y1Y - Film Cultures II: Politics and Global Media

Examines film theory and practice from the 1950s onward, and the impact of media change on earlier film cultures and aesthetics.

Instructor: Scott Richmond
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1
Exclusion: INI214Y1, INI314Y1, INI315Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations, 2. Thought, Belief and Behaviour

 
Group B Courses: Genre and Modes
 

CIN210H1F - Horror Film

This course provides students with a history of the development of the horror genre as well as a variety of theoretical frameworks through which to analyse horror texts, including those that approach the economic, technological, socio-political, and psychoanalytic dimensions of horror cinema.

Exclusion: INI226H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN211H1S - Science Fiction Film

Science Fiction films as an international genre. Cultural and political contexts. SF film's narrative and conceptual components.

Exclusion: INI227H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN212H1F - Cinema and Sensation I: Action/Spectacle (formerly INI222H1)
Action cinema holds a dominant place in our contemporary era of the blockbuster and CGI effects. This course examines the modes and function of this popular genre, while also tracing Action's longevity and diversity to include its significant precursors, its social contexts, and forms of spectatorship. Topics include: Adventure heroes and comic bodies; sensational serial melodramas; crazy car-chase movies; 1980s Hard Bodies and action comedies; Asian martial arts films; combat war movies; crime thrillers; and contemporary science fiction-action hybrids.

Instructor: Bart Testa
Exclusion: INI222H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN213H1S - Cinema and Sensation II: Sex (formerly INI223H1)

Whether boldly sensationalized or subdued to the point of coy indirection, the representation of sex in film has always been controversial. This course examines how sex, in the close regulation of its representation and in defiance and circumvention of such control, suggests themes and concerns tied to social mores and notions of the self, visual pleasure and the sexual body. Topics include: obscenity laws and the history of American film censorship; the emergence of sexploitation and pornography; art films’ erotic maturity, and erotic tendencies in contemporary popular cinema.

Exclusion: INI223H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN310Y1Y - Avant-Garde and Experimental Film (formerly INI322Y1)
Film experimentation in the context of modern art and poetry from the 1920s through the 1990s.  Influences range from Cubism and Dada-Surrealism to late-era modernism and postmodernism.

Instructor: Bart Testa
Prerequisite: CIN105Y
Exclusion: INI322Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN312Y1Y - Documentary Film (formerly INI325Y1)
Critical survey of documentary practice including newsreels, direct cinema, cinema verité, ethnographic films, and various hybrid narrative forms, with emphasis on the rhetorical, aesthetic, and political dimensions of the "art of record." Topics include: Poetics, argument, and modes of address; evidence, authenticity, and persuasion; filmmaker/subject/audience nexus; historiography, hagiography, and memory; reflexive irony and performance.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y
Exclusion: INI322Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations; (3) Society and its Institutions.

 

CIN320H1S - Autobiography and Cinema

This course explores the mode of autobiographical film, and examines the questions that arise when we turn the camera on ourselves. How does cinema’s changing apparatus, from 16mm film to the YouTube vlog, allow for the personal to expand into the realm of the public? 

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN410H1F - Classicism Revisited: Revision & Resistance

This course will first examine some of the central tenets of Hollywood Classicism (primarily as elaborated by Bordwell, Staiger & Thompson in their 1985 book, Classical Hollywood Cinema), and then moves on to oppositional positions adopted by some scholars and refinements advanced by others, taking up issues of realism, genre, excess, and affect.  Finally, the course will examine arguments for and against post-classicism, and how the concept of classicism continues to influence recent film scholarship.

Instructor: Charlie Keil
Prerequisite:  At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

Group C: Social and Cultural Practices
 

CIN230H1S - The Business of Film

Cinema as a commercial enterprise. Production, distribution, and exhibition in the political economy of North American film culture.

Exclusion: INI228H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities or Social Science
Breadth Requirement: 3. Society and its Institutions

 

CIN330Y1Y -  Feminist Approaches to Cinema (formerly INI323Y1)
Gender politics of feminist film culture since the 1970s.  Topics include:  Apparatus theory and its legacy, models of spectatorship, feminist historiography, stardom, the cinematic (re)production of identity, the relationship between social movements and cinema; "postfeminism."

Instructor: Corinn Columpar
Prerequisite:  CIN105Y1 or permission of the instructor.
Exclusion: INI323Y1 
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1+2 (1) Creative and Cultural Representations; (2) Thought, Belief and Behaviour

 

CIN340H1F - Black Screen Practices

In this course, we will examine the rise of new forms of critique alongside the rise of global Black screen practices, with an emphasis on the ways Black scholars engage with both dominant and emergent cinemas – to include video installation and evolving digital media and platforms. 

Instructor: Kass Banning
Prerequisite:
CIN105Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN349H1Y - Screenwriting

Formerly INI388H1
Students will develop screenwriting skills under the guidance of a renowned screenwriter-in-residence through a combination of writing workshops and individual consultations. Like the course, the appointment of the Universal Screenwriter-in-Residence occurs biannually.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, and two additional Cinema Studies full-course equivalents
Exclusion: INI388H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN430H1F - Bond, James Bond

This advanced undergraduate seminar will explore the phenomenon of the James Bond series with an emphasis on the aesthetic, economic and political dimensions of Agent 007 in literature and on screen. To do so, we will not only explore the origins of Bond in Ian Fleming's post-war spy novels but also trace the development of the character's screen persona as embodied by six different actors.

Instructor: Benjamin Wright
Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of the instructor. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN431H1S - The Revolution Will/Will Not be Televised

What were “the Sixties?” Were the 1960s a really colorful and trippy background for romantic love stories between beautiful young white people, rich in the drama of war and free love and easy drugs? (Think Across the Universe [2007].) There are plenty of movies that say the ‘60s were just that, and we’ll watch some of them. But the ‘60s (1964-1974) were more than just a paisley rebellion powered by pretty people. The decade also produced profound changes in international relations, transformed understandings about the people’s participation in social and political life, and changed (for better and for worse) relationships between the people and their governments. And the Sixties were also a time when popular media—film, radio, television, magazines, the music industry—not only reflected these upheavals, but had to decide whether to further radical change or impede it. That is, there was a media revolution as well as a cultural and political one: popular media were seen as tools for articulating politics, and as having a politics of their own. This course explores the key issues of that era—racial equality, sexual pluralism, feminism, anti-imperialism—as they were mediated, and as they involved popular media in debates over freedom, equality, and law and order. We will look at a set of cases studies that take up the tension between the mediation of politics and the politics of mediation (with a fair amount of flowers and psychedelic lighting thrown in). This course is an opportunity to make connections across media—between film and music, between music and comic books, between radio and television—and to explore the unfolding of historical change through the ways that people experienced and produced that change in their own lives.

Instructor: Nicholas Sammond
Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

Group D Courses: Theory and Criticism

 

CIN353H1S - Issues in Film Authorship II (formerly INI375H1)
Advanced study of issues in film authorship through intensive examination of one or more major filmmakers.

Instructor: Bart Testa
Prerequisite: CIN105Y
Exclusion: INI375H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN364H1F - Theories of Media
In-depth history of humanistic theories of media and mediation, with a focus on aesthetics. Covers classical (Marx, Benjamin, Freud) and contemporary (digital) theories of media. Includes extensive consideration of aesthetic forms, including animation, cinema, television, installation art, video games, net.art, and others.

Instructor: Scott Richmond
Prerequisite: CIN105Y
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN369H1S -  Critical Writing on Film (formerly INI384H1)
The practice of film criticism: studies of examples of journalistic and scholarly critical writing; practical sessions of process writing; and collaborative editing. Course includes regular film screenings.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1 and one additional Cinema Studies full-course equivalent/ permission of the instructor 
Exclusion: INI384H1
Breadth Requirement: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN450H1S - Time and the Human Condition

According to sociologist George Simmel, modern life requires that individuals conceive of their lives as organized according to an “impersonal time schedule” (1903) that replaced the circadian rhythms and chronobiological processes of agriculture-based societies. This epochal shift is accompanied by the rise of cinema, arguably the time-based medium that is most synonymous with modernity. In the late twentieth century this shift was exacerbated by the advent of personal computing; as a result, screens (from the cinema to the iPad) have become the privileged site for social interactions: as Paul Virilio noted, “The screen has become the city square” (1997), replacing live assemblies of personal, mercantile, juridical, and even religious nature. Through an examination of a variety of visual media, including painting, still photography, cinema, and internet art, this course explores how what Mary Ann Doane described as the “emergence of cinematic time” (2002) has affected our perception of the human condition. 

Instructor: Alberto Zambenedetti
Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN451H1S - Cinema And Exploration

This fourth year seminar will examine the entangled histories of cinema and exploration and the manner in which these traditions trace out and conceptualize “the world” in the era of globalization. We will examine the historical role of cinema in the documentation and imaginative depiction of encounters with the unknown territories, cultures, and phenomena, including geographic, colonial, ethnographic, and scientific explorations from the poles to equator, the deep seas to deserts, outer and inner space, and history and speculative futures. Interwoven with the examination of these traditions will be reflections on the role of moving image media as an instrument of exploration in its own right, particularly through its extensions of the human senses into “adventures in perception.”

Instructor: James Cahill
Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

Group E Courses: History and Nation
 

CIN374Y1Y   American Filmmaking in the Studio Era (formerly INI324Y1)

This course examines the American studio system (1917-1969) with an emphasis on the underlying economic, ideological, and formal features of the so-called "Golden Age of Hollywood."

Instructor: Benjamin Wright
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Exclusion: INI384H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement:1+3 (1) Creative and Cultural Representations; (3) Society and its Institutions

 

CIN376Y1Y - Chinese Cinema

Examination of Chinese films in their three post-World War II production centres: The People's Republic of China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. Commercial, political, and aesthetic trends; international reception; major auteurs and genres. Directors include Tsui Hark, Chen Kaige, Zang Yimou, Edward Yang, John Woo, and Wong Kar-Wai.

Instructor: Bart Testa
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Exclusion: INI390Y1
Recommended Preparation: 
CIN201Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN378H1F   Israeli Cinema

Focusing on the plurality and diversity of Israeli cinema, this course will examine film’s mediation of Israeli culture since the 1960s.  It will include discussion of multiple filmmakers, including Amos Gitai, Daniel Wachsmann, Michal Bat-Adam, and Michal Aviad. 

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN379H1F    Hungarian Cinema (formerly INI378H1) 
Examines historical trends, influential filmmakers, and social and cultural factors influencing the development of Hungarian cinema, assessing its impact within the context of Eastern Europe and internationally.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1/ permission of instructor 
Exclusion: INI381H1/F (2010) Aspects of a National Cinema: Hungarian Cinema, INI378H1 

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN470H1F - Theorizing Canadianicity: Place and Difference

In this course, we will explore critical and theoretical approaches to Canada’s screen cultures that transform normative conceptions of the national, with an emphasis on recent indigenous and diasporic production – to include both screen aesthetics and conditions of emergence.

Instructor: Kass Banning
Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

Group F Courses: Independent Studies
 

CIN490Y1Y - Independent Studies in Cinema

See course description for CIN492H1 listed below. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN491H1F - Independent Studies in Cinema

See course description for CIN492H1 listed below. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN492H1S - Independent Studies in Cinema

Independent research projects devised by students and supervised by Cinema Studies faculty. Open to advanced Specialist and Major students in the Cinema Studies Program. Submit applications to the Undergraduate Program Office: Fall 2018 courses by May 1, 2018, Winter 2019 courses by November 1, 2018, Summer 2019 courses by April 1, 2019. See Forms for application form. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 
Group G Courses: Cross-Listed

Please contact the home department for more information.

 

EAS242H1 - Japanese Cinemas I

This course investigates how film aesthetics relate to the most profound socio-historical problems of Japanese modernity. It also considers the ways various filmmakers employ cinematic form to engage the social problems of their moment. Part I focuses on the 1890s - 1950s.

Exclusion: EAS237Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

EAS279H1 - East Asian Ecocinema

The course examines the ethical, political, historic and aesthetic dimensions of Asian Ecocinema (environmental films that engage with the Asia-based global environmental crisis) and discusses the films' ways of connecting place and planet.

Prerequisite: EAS103H1/EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

FCS 310Y1Y : French Cinema

French Cinema from its origins to the present. We consider the cinema’s emergence in fin du siècle France, and major movements such as: Impressionism, Poetic Realism, Surrealism, cinéma de qualitéla nouvelle vague, and the cinéma du look. We consider some of the major French cinéastes, such as Breillat, Bresson, Carné, Clouzot, Epstein, Feuillade, Gance, Godard, Guitry, Lumière, Marker, Méliès, Ophüls, Renoir, Resnais, Truffaut, and Varda. Consideration will be given to the theoretical, political, social, aesthetic, and cultural development of French cinema and culture, and to the influence of French cinema globally. Knowledge of French is helpful but not required.

Prerequisite: At least 5 course credits in any subject.
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

FCS392H1 - Special Topics in French Cultural Studies II

Studies on an individual writer or specific area of literature. For more information, see http://www.french.utoronto.ca/undergraduate/courses/french_cultural_studies.

Prerequisite: At least five coures in any subject.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

FIN250H1F - Finnish Cinema

Development of Finnish cinema from its parochial beginnings to its international recognition. The great pastoral tradition; the war memories (Laine, Kassila, Parikka); socio-political engagement of the 60s (Donner, Jarva), the paucity of the 70s (Mollberg); the universal outsider themes of the 80s (Aki and Mika Kaurismaki). Readings and subtitles in English. (Offered in alternate years)

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

HIS345H1 - History and Film

This course is designed to further students knowledge of films relationship to the events they depict and their undeniable power as representational systems to render history effectively. This will necessarily entail both close examination of the formal systems film rely upon and an understanding of the distinction between fictional and non-fictional forms in film.

Prerequisite: Two full courses in history or permission of instructor
Recommended Preparation: INI212Y1/CIN201Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 3. Society and its Institutions

 

HIS467H1 - French Colonial Indochina: History, Cultures, Texts, Film

Examines French colonial Indochina through several different lenses. Themes include the cross-cultural contact zones between colonial and colonized societies, imperial culture, expressions of colonial power, and forms of opposition. Colonial novels, translated resistance literature, documentaries, and films are utilized as primary sources to be examined critically.

Prerequisite: ANT344Y1/EAS204Y1/GGR342H1/HIS104Y1/HIS107Y1/HIS280Y1/HIS283Y1/HIS284Y/HIS315H1/HIS388H1/NEW369Y1 Exclusion: HIS467Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 3. Society and its Institutions

 

ITAL341H1 - Gender and Genre in Italian Cinema

The course looks at Italian cinema from the perspective of gender and genre studies. While the focus will be primarily on film, the course will also engage with different media and discuss how these have informed and influenced Italian notions of masculinity and femininity throughout the Twentieth Century. The emphasis on genre will provide the structure to organize a discourse that will embrace very diverse and multifaceted texts, and will enable students to develop their analytical and critical skills in the field. This course includes a component designed to enhance students’ research experience. (Given in English)

Instructor: Alberto Zambenedetti
Exclusion: ITA340Y
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

JSU325H1 - Queerly Canadian

This course focuses on Canadian literary and artistic productions that challenge prevailing notions of nationality and sexuality, exploring not only how artists struggle with that ongoing Canadian thematic of being and belonging, but also celebrate pleasure and desire as a way of imagining and articulating an alternative national politics.

Prerequisite: SDS255H1/SDS256H1/CDN2671 (formerly UNI267H1), CDN268H1 (formerly UNI268H1) or permission of the instructor
Exclusion: SDS375H1 - Special Topics: Queerly Canadian, UNI325H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

SLA247H1S - Yugoslav Cinema

An overview of the Yugoslav cinematic tradition from the 1950s onwards. Topics include Yugoslav film-making in the context of the European New Wave; cinema d’auteur (Makavejev, Pavlović, Kusturica); art and politics in a communist state; the struggle of experimentalism and traditionalism. Taught in English. All films with subtitles.

Exclusion: SLA427H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

SLA333H1S - Animated Film in Europe

Trends in the history of European animated film, focusing on Central and Eastern European cinematic traditions. Aesthetics of animated image and peculiarities of animation as an art form. Films are analyzed in their artistic, cultural and political contexts. Taught in English, English subtitles.

Exclusion: SLA233H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

SPA375H1 - Latin American Cinema

This course examines the social, political, and cultural contexts of recent Latin American cinema. Since comprehensive coverage of either the period or the range of national sources is clearly impossible, primary focus is given to recent internationally received filmic production, with more attention to Argentina and Mexico. In each case the representation of national history and identity together with the relation between cinematic production and economic and social conditions will be examined. Latin American cinema has responded to revolution, military dictatorship, the restoration of democracy, the effects of economic change on rural and urban demographics, and the marginalization of minority populations. We will also consider how a recent focus on representations of history, memory, and racialized and gendered bodies have contributed to an increase in the transnational and cosmopolitan reception of Latin American film. The course is designed for students completing a minor, major, or specialization in Spanish, as well as students from Cinema Studies and other fields.

Instructor: Eva-Lynn Jagoe
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations