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Undergraduate Courses

Courses in the curriculum of the Cinema Studies Institute encourage a thorough examination of the cinema, as students receive a grounding in film study in its aesthetic, technological, economic, and sociocultural dimensions. Core courses focus on film analysis and the integration of film history and theory. Advanced courses allow for more in-depth examination of particular topics, ranging from specific filmmakers and genres to how cinema engages with different cultures, spectators, and nation-states.

Cinema Studies courses (Groups A through F) offered in the 2018-2019 academic year are listed below. Links to their timetable information will be added when that information is confirmed. For a complete course list, including those not being offered in 2018-2019, please refer to the Faculty of Arts & Science Calendar.

Cross-Listed courses: (Group G) offered in 2018-2019 can also be found below. Consult the respective department for days, times and locations.

Where applicable, prerequisites and restrictions are listed after each course description.

 

2019 Summer Session

Y courses: May 6 - August 22, 2019
F courses: May 6 - June 26, 2019
S courses: July 2 - August 22, 2019

Arts & Science students can enrol via ACORN beginning on March 1, 2019

Students from other St. George campus faculties can enrol beginning on April 16, 2019 at 6am.

UTM and UTSC students can enrol beginning on April 17, 2019 at 6am.

 

Group A Courses: Foundations
 

CIN105Y1Y - Introduction to Film Study

Introduction to film analysis; concepts of film style and narrative. Topics include: documentary, avant-garde, genres, authorship, ideology, and representation.

Day and Time: Mondays and Wednesdays, 12-4pm
Instructor: Benjamin Wright
Exclusion: INI115Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 
Group C Courses: Social and Cultural Practices
 

CIN240H1F - The Political Thriller

How do moving images reflect on contemporary political realities? In what ways does film form shape its content? How do films function as a political medium, an art, and a form of entertainment, and can these categories coexist? This course provides ways to answer these questions through an examination of the political thriller genre from its origins in Hollywood, its expansion as a global form, and its renaissance in the 21st century. Drawing upon films from North America, Europe, East Asia, and Latin America, we will explore how the genre poses important political questions through aesthetic means, and tackles themes including democracy, capitalism, conspiracy, surveillance, terrorism, agency, freedom, and morality.

Day and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12-4pm
Instructor: Patrick Marshall
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 3. Society and its Institutions

 

CIN340H1F - Queer Spectatorship

From the psychoanalytic theory of the 1970s to more recent accounts of theatre patrons in specific historical periods, the cinematic spectator has rarely been constructed as anything other than straight: their presumed heterosexuality informing not only their relationship to images on the screen, but also the way they occupy the theatre space and interact with other spectators within it. This series of infrequently examined assumptions provokes the following question: what would happen to such understandings of film viewers if they were to be considered through the prism of queer looking, queer communal ethics, or queer visions of political aesthetics? The goal of this course will be to utilize many of the analytical models of cinema studies (history, theory, aesthetics, political economy, sociology) to reflect upon the act of viewing itself, to investigate not just films as texts, but films as vessels for versions of subjectivity, community, and erotic life. Featured screenings include: Goodbye Dragon Inn, Late Spring, Velvet Goldmine, News from Home, In a Year of 13 Moons, Looking for Langston, Illusions, The Watermelon Woman, Blue, Me and Rubyfruit, Hausu, Can You Ever Forgive Me?, The Sealed Soil, and A Zed and Two Noughts. Readings will include pieces by: Samuel Delany, Elizabeth Freeman, Judith Butler, José Esteban Muñoz, Rosalind Galt, Michael Cobb, Heather Love, Rebecca Wanzo, Kara Keeling, Douglas Crimp, Michel Foucault, Kathryn Bond Stockton, and Mel Y. Chen.

Day and Time: Mondays and Wednesdays, 12-4pm
Instructor: Erin Nunoda
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

Group D Courses: Theory and Criticism
 

CIN260H1S - Gross Out! The Body in Comedy

This course delves into the depths of the body on screen, and follows the outwards trajectory of the body’s various fluids in comedic moving image media. Beginning in the early 1970s, we will examine films that portray the body and its processes with a newfound explicitness, beginning with Animal House (John Landis, 1978). We will question why eliciting disgust is so ripe for humour while critiquing comedy’s shortcomings in terms of its representations of gender, race, sexuality, and class. This course will also make a case for gross-out beyond mainstream representations of white male arrested development through independent female-directed horror, queer auteur John Waters, and the grotesquery of human-to-animal transitions in African-American and Japanese cinema. Considering disgust and laughter as both inciting corporeal, involuntary responses, the course will put foundational theories of humour (Freud, Bergson, and Bakhtin) into conversation with scholarly work on disgust and abjection (Kolnai, Kristeva, and Bataille). This course aims to shed light on lowbrow media that has traditionally been maligned or overlooked, and focuses on the rich critical discourses that it provokes, giving students the necessary tools for analyzing representations of the body and the transgression of its limits in moving image media.

Day and Time: Mondays and Wednesdays, 12-4pm
Instructor: Kate J. Russell
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN360H1F - Listening to Film

A large part of a film’s meaning is contained within its soundtrack. This course focuses on cinema’s quintessentially audio-visual nature, and exploring the ways in which sound functions in cinema. Since the beginning, film theorists have been focusing on the relationship between sound and image in terms of their dependence on each other. The key objective of this class is to provide you with the terminology and the theoretical methods necessary for understanding the importance of sound to the film experience, how sounds convey meaning in relationship to images, and also how the use of sound and music reflect different historical and cultural influences.

This class encourages a critical, creative approach, and awareness of historical contexts and theoretical frameworks. Some of the topics that the class will address: the history of sound technologies and the “coming of sound”; theories on the human voice in cinema; the principles that govern the use of music and sound effects, and the evolving practice of sound recording and reproduction in film. These topics are examined through reading and writing assignments, film screenings, listening sessions and in-class presentations.

Day and Time: Mondays and Wednesdays, 5-9pm
Instructor: Müge Tufenk
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 2. Thought, Belief and Behaviour

 

Group E Courses: History and Nation
 

CIN378Y0 - Aspects of a National Cinema: Ireland

This course is offered through Summer Abroad. For more information, please visit summerabroad.utoronto.ca.

This course seeks to foster a deeper comprehension of Irish culture through an exploration of contemporary Irish films. The course will examine a range of recent works to understand Irish film in the context of Irish culture and identity, while being attentive to both industrial and governmental structures that help determine what is produced and seen. At the same time, negotiations between an Irish American / Canadian diasporic market for nostalgia films and local investment in more complex social portraits will be studied. Lastly, how Ireland’s iconic landscape has been mobilized in both recent Hollywood blockbuster films and serial television – the “selling” of Ireland including “screen tourism”) – and its impact on local ecologies – both natural and industrial – will be explored. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Instructor: Kass Banning
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN380H1S - Palestinian Cinema

The course examines works by a selection of Palestinian filmmakers with the aim of investigating how Palestinian experiences of movement, space, and temporality are represented, and how they are each shaped by distinct conceptions of Palestinian identity. We will screen films by filmmakers both in Palestine and in Israel, as well as diasporic filmmakers based in the West, covering the period from the late 1980s up until the present moment.

The course challenges and reexamines the parameters of national cinema itself through a survey of Palestinian cinema. A central question underpinning the course is: can we can speak of a Palestinian cinema as such, one based on common thematic and formal commonalities? Towards that end, we will need to study the approach and style of select directors hailing from different backgrounds, such as Elia Suleiman, Michel Khleifi, Annemarie Jacir, Tawfik Abu Wael, and Larissa Sansour. A significant portion of the course will focus on textual analysis of the films, while also placing them within a larger philosophical and sociopolitical context by means of readings not necessarily cinema-related. We will also take into account industrial and material conditions that have shaped each production, playing a significant role in its marketing and distribution, and indeed, its political efficacy.

Day and Time: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12-4pm
Instructor: Ramtin Teymouri
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

 

2019 -2020 Fall - Winter Session

Group A Courses: Foundations
 

CIN105Y1Y - Introduction to Film Study

Introduction to film analysis; concepts of film style and narrative. Topics include: documentary, avant-garde, genres, authorship, ideology, and representation.

Instructor: Brian Jacobson
Exclusion: INI115Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN201Y1Y - Film Cultures I: Art and Industry

Emergence of cinema from its start until the studio system in the first half of the 20th Century. Examines the practices, theories, and debates.

Instructor: Charlie Keil (Fall), James Cahill (Winter)
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Exclusion: INI212Y1, INI215Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations, 2. Thought, Belief and Behaviour

 

CIN301Y1Y - Film Cultures II: Politics and Global Media

Examines film theory and practice from the 1950s onward, and the impact of media change on earlier film cultures and aesthetics.

Instructor: Scott Richmond
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1
Exclusion: INI214Y1, INI314Y1, INI315Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations, 2. Thought, Belief and Behaviour

 
Group B Courses: Genre and Modes
 

CIN211H1F - Science Fiction Film

Science and fiction are two terms that seem diametrically opposed. Science purports to use rationality combined with careful observation to produce verifiable truths. Fiction, on the other hand, is concerned with the fabrication of immaterial realities. How then, do these seemingly antithetical pursuits find themselves joined in the genre of science fiction (sf)? This course will attempt to show, through a close reading of twelve sf films, that scientific truths and narrative fictions can be difficult to disentangle. By focusing on common motifs in sf cinema—such as alien contact, apocalyptic anxiety, artificial intelligence, and time travel (to name a few)—this course explores how science fiction uses fabricated futures to comment on present realities.

Instructor: Bart Testa
Exclusion: INI227H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN215H1S - Fantasy Film
This course examines the development of the Fantasy imagination in cinema from the start of film production (i.e., George Melies) through the classical era (i.e., Wizard of Oz) to the contemporary proliferation of Fantasy cinema (i.e., Lord of the Rings, Snow White and the Huntsman). Course includes study of Asian, European and South American Fantasy films.

Instructor: Bart Testa
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN216H1F - Crime Film Traditions

Originating in the mid-19 century from journalistic accounts and detective stories, crime fiction has emerged as one of the dominant popular genres in the 20th century across a variety of media and platforms, from true crime dime novels to radio dramas, from hard-boiled literature to prestige television series. Rejuvenated in the 21st century by the consolidation of gaming culture and the rise of podcasting, crime narratives have expanded to transmediality, stretching the boundaries between fiction and documentary practices. In this context, the culturally porous and generically elastic crime film had remained one of the most enduring cinematic expressions of sociopolitical anxieties related to class, gender, race, and ethnicity. This course examines a selection of crime film traditions across various geographical areas and historical periods, investigating the resilience of this form from the silent period to the present day.

Instructor: Alberto Zambenedetti
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN312Y1Y - Documentary Film (formerly INI325Y1)
Critical survey of documentary practice including newsreels, direct cinema, cinema verité, ethnographic films, and various hybrid narrative forms, with emphasis on the rhetorical, aesthetic, and political dimensions of the "art of record." Topics include: Poetics, argument, and modes of address; evidence, authenticity, and persuasion; filmmaker/subject/audience nexus; historiography, hagiography, and memory; reflexive irony and performance.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Exclusion: INI325Y1
Recommended Preparation: CIN201Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations; (3) Society and its Institutions.

 

CIN314Y1Y - Genre, Narrative, and Narration in Film
This advanced course examines modes of cinematic narrative and the conventions and histories of selected film genres largely through analysis of selected examples. Critical theories concerning narrative structure, narration, film genre, the roles that genres play in film industry and social history will be explored. The second term also reaches to broader types of narrative in film (like art cinema). Concepts will be drawn from established genre theories, from structuralist, narratological and neo-formalist modelling of film narratives.

Instructor: Bart Testa
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Exclusion: INI329Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations, 2. Thought, Belief and Behaviour

 

CIN320H1F - The (Im)Possible Future of Three-Dimensional Cinema

This course will investigate the historical, theoretical and aesthetic developments of 3-D cinema in Hollywood from its “golden era” in the 1950s to its recent digital revival in the 21st century. In this critical study of cinema’s three-dimensional format, we will examine several significant debates, discussions and films that draw upon 3-D’s distinct “mode of visioning” and the new parameters and orientations it introduces to cinema’s spectatorial experience.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN322H1F - Cult Cinema

This course examines "cult" and "exploitation" cinema. It examines the growing popularity of cult/exploitation films as an emerging cinematic subculture that valorizes disreputable or "trash" cinema. A number of sub-genres within exploitation film, including teen films, educational/instructional films, sexploitation, and Blaxploitation, will be explored. The social politics of appropriating texts through ironic reading strategies will also be considered.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Exclusion: INI396H1F (2011), CIN320H1F (20145), CIN320H1S (2016)
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN412H1F - The "End" in Cinema

This seminar intended to take a discussion format to explore two jaggedly aligned concerns: the formal properties involved in ending narratives and the structural and thematic role played in the Western imagination of apocalypse (the concept of the end of time/history). Apocalyptic motifs have taken on a controlling force in several established genres, notably horror and science fiction. Apocalyptic motifs have also spawned genres of their own, like the “Zombie Apocalypse” (e.g., World War Z; 28 Days Later) and ecological catastrophe movies (e.g., The Day After Tomorrow), as well as planet killing asteroids (e.g., Armageddon). The course shifts from closely formal narrative concerns to broadly thematic and political issues. The course seeks ways to imbricate them by taking a quite prejudicial selection of films to explore these concerns. Richard Neupert’s The End: Narration and Closure in the Cinema will serve the key text, alongside Frank Kermode’s The Sense of an Ending. Other texts like K.M. Thompson’s Apocalyptic Dread, John Gary’s Black Mass, and Cormac McCarthy’s The Road will figure in the course. Films will include Weekend, The Birds, When Worlds Collide, Taxi Driver, Time of the Wolf, Children of Men, and Pulse.

Instructor: Bart Testa
Prerequisite:  At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, and CIN301Y1. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

Group C: Social and Cultural Practices
 

CIN230H1S - The Business of Film

Cinema as a commercial enterprise. Production, distribution, and exhibition in the political economy of North American film culture.

Exclusion: INI228H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities or Social Science
Breadth Requirement: 3. Society and its Institutions

 

CIN240H1S - The Hollywood Renaissance

1970s Hollywood Cinema.

Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 3. Society and its Institutions

 

CIN332Y1Y -  Screening Race
How race functions in cinema. Topics include: the foundational role of racial inscription and its expansion beyond the black/white paradigm, visual ethnography, 'the primitive,' and Orientalism, indigenous media, the 'Black Atlantic' and Diaspora, Banlieu and exilic film practice and theory, border aesthetics, race and urban space, 'post-race', and the evolving racial imaginary.

Prerequisite:  CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1
Exclusion: INI327Y1 
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations; 2. Thought, Belief and Behaviour

 

CIN340H1F - The Media Event: Celebration, Accident & Catastrophe

This course seeks to analyse the relationship between moving image media and the event. But what is an event? Although this term is popular in contemporary philosophy and theory, it is one that escapes easy definition. This course will explore the different ways that the event has been theorized, both in media studies and philosophy, to develop a nuanced understanding of what we mean when we speak of an “event.” In media studies, some thinkers consider the media capture of exceptional but rigidly traditional activities as constitutive of “media events”: royal weddings, the Olympics, etc. Other theorists find the event to be the opposite: those unexpected catastrophic disasters that unsettle the everydayness of our world. In both instances, the presence of media and its ability to capture and transmit images of the event becomes a central issue. To try to grapple with these different ideas, we will look at how the notion of the event has been taken up in Media Studies (including Television Studies and Documentary Studies), Narrative Studies and Philosophy.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN430H1F - Everything is Terrible, or the Good Life

Over the course of the 20th and 21st centuries, a great many critics have despaired at the damage new media technologies do to our individual lives and to our collective life. The other side of this complaint is the promise of such new media technologies to offer more pleasurable, more optimistic, or simply better ways of living. This course tracks both sides of this dialectic across several moments in the intellectual history of film and media studies in the hope of better understanding our contemporary entanglements in toxic media environments and cultures. To that end, we will pay particular attention to the recent burst of critical (and not-so-critical) writing about social media and internet use. Throughout, our focus will be less on the theoretical agendas of media critics than on the way theory can inform our sense of practical problems and prospects for better living; our reading will range across scholarly, pop-intellectual, and journalistic work. Our reading will be bookended by Theodor Adorno’s 1951 Minima Moralia: Reflections from Damaged Life and James Bridle’s 2018 A New Dark Age. Screenings and aesthetic texts will range widely across media and genres, including films like Ingrid Goes West, Citizenfour, and The Social Network, video games like Grand Theft Auto, and media art by artists such as Hito Shteyerl, Aria Dean, and Thompson+Craighead.

Instructor: Scott Richmond
Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN431H1S - Advanced Study in Cinema as Social and Cultural Practice

Consideration of cinema and its social relations. Past seminars include: “American Independent Film,” “Children in the Movies,” “Sub-Saharan African Cinema,” “International Film Festivals,” “Interactive Documentary,” “Graphic!," “The Revolution Will/Will Not Be Televised,” "Social Problem Films," and "Programming and Curation."

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, and CIN301Y1. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN432H1S - Graphic!

This is a course in vernacular media. It is interested in exploring the longstanding and constantly changing relationship between print and other forms of media, including film, radio, television and more recent online platforms. Conepts like "convergence culture" and "transmedia storytelling," as useful as they are for describing our current intermediated lives, aren't new. This course explores a long history of intermediality in which popular cultural forms - comics, cartoons, films, radio programs, etc. - become forums for exploring important social, cultural, and political ideas considered too "lowbrow" for more refined forms of cultural practice and production.

Instructor: Nicholas Sammond
Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, and CIN301Y1. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

Group D Courses: Theory and Criticism

 

CIN352H1S - Issues in Film Authorship I
Advanced study of issues in film authorship through intensive examination of one or more major filmmakers.

Instructor: Angelica Fenner
Prerequisite: CIN105Y
Exclusion: INI374H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN362H1S - Animals and Cinema
This course explores cinema's century-long fascination with animals. Its investigations are organized around three central questions. First, what does cinema teach us about animals (why and how we look at animals on film, how we represent and understand animals through film, and what lessons we hope to gain from animals on film)? Second, what do animal films reveal or teach us about the cinema? Third, what are the aesthetic, theoretical, and ethical stakes of such encounters between animals and cinema?

Instructor: James Cahill
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1
Exclusion: INI398H1F (2011), CIN360H1F (2013), CIN340H1S (2016)
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 2. Though, Belief and Behaviour

 

CIN369H1S -  Critical Writing on Film
The practice of film criticism: studies of examples of journalistic and scholarly critical writing; practical sessions of process writing; and collaborative editing. Course includes regular film screenings. There is an application process for this course. Please see Undergraduate Forms.

Prerequisite: CIN105Y1 and one additional Cinema Studies full-course equivalent 
Exclusion: INI384H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN450H1F - Advanced Study in Theory and Criticism

Advanced study of select approaches to film theory and criticism. Past seminars include: “Corporeality and the Cinema,” “The Cinematic City: Urban Spaces in Film,” “Sound and Music in Film,” “Expanded Cinema,” “Digital Cinema,” and "Cinema and Architecture: Scenes, Screens, Studios."

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

Group E Courses: History and Nation
 

CIN370H1S - Canadian Cinemas: The Avant-Garde

The Canadian avant-garde (or experimental) cinema can be regarded from various perspectives. This course will take a critical position that leans on analytical interpretation of the films and filmmakers as working within broad experimental traditions. Some, like animation, that reaches back to the 1920s. Others began in the 1960s and reach to the present. The course will also argue for distinctions in the Canadian avant-garde film that mark it as different from American and European movements.

There are major artists within the Canadian avant-garde like Joyce Weiland, Michael Snow, Arthur Lipsett, David Rimmer and Bruce Elder. There have also been visual artists who have made films occasionally, like Greg Curneo and Jack Chambers. There are likewise second-generation experimentalists, like Richard Kerr, Philip Hoffmann and Carl Brown, and artists who have applied experimental forms to politically activist ends, like John Grayson and Mike Hoolboom. There have also been some filmmakers who allied themselves with the avant-garde early in their careers before they moved into directing feature-narrative films and television. The best-known are David Cronenberg, Jeremy Podwesa, Atom Egoyan and Patricia Gruben. Their works will be examined alongside recognized classics.

Instructor: Bart Testa
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Exclusion: FCS391H1, INI385Y1, INI385H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN470H1F - Trauma and Cinema

This course explores how traumas are remembered and represented in cinema. While investigating different narratives of the Holocaust and genocide, terrorism, postcolonialism, and migratory/refugee traumatic journeys, this course will explore distinctive modes of treating historical events/crises in relation to the theory of trauma. It starts from examination of psychoanalytical approach, moves to memory studies, postcolonial framework(s) and affect theory. The aim of this course is to understand how different traumatic historical events can be represented on screen and the ways in which the complicated relationship between history and memory can be informed through different theoretical modes.

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, and CIN301Y1. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

Group F Courses: Independent Studies
 

CIN490Y1Y - Independent Studies in Cinema

See course description for CIN492H1 listed below. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN491H1F - Independent Studies in Cinema

See course description for CIN492H1 listed below. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN492H1S - Independent Studies in Cinema

Independent research projects devised by students and supervised by Cinema Studies faculty. Open to advanced Specialist and Major students in the Cinema Studies Program. Submit applications to the Undergraduate Program Office: Fall 2018 courses by May 1, 2018, Winter 2019 courses by November 1, 2018, Summer 2019 courses by April 1, 2019. See Forms for application form. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 
Group G Courses: Cross-Listed

Please contact the home department for more information.

 

EAS278H1F - Approaches to Korean Cinema

This course explores the postwar development of film in Korea with a focus on the analysis of film form, genre and historical context.

Day and time: Thursdays, 3-6pm
Instructor: Michelle Cho
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

SLA333H1S - Animated Film in Europe

Trends in the history of European animated film, focusing on Central and Eastern European cinematic traditions. Aesthetics of animated image and peculiarities of animation as an art form. Films are analyzed in their artistic, cultural and political contexts. Taught in English, English subtitles.

Day and time: Wednesdays, 9am to 12pm
Instructor: Laura Pontieri
Exclusion: SLA233H1
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations