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Undergraduate Courses

Courses in the curriculum of the Cinema Studies Institute encourage a thorough examination of the cinema, as students receive a grounding in film study in its aesthetic, technological, economic, and sociocultural dimensions. Core courses focus on film analysis and the integration of film history and theory. Advanced courses allow for more in-depth examination of particular topics, ranging from specific filmmakers and genres to how cinema engages with different cultures, spectators, and nation-states.

Cinema Studies courses (Groups A through F) offered in the 2018-2019 academic year are listed below. Links to their timetable information will be added when that information is confirmed. For a complete course list, including those not being offered in 2018-2019, please refer to the Faculty of Arts & Science Calendar.

Cross-Listed courses: (Group G) offered in 2018-2019 can also be found below. Consult the respective department for days, times and locations.

Where applicable, prerequisites and restrictions are listed after each course description.

 

2018 -2019 Fall - Winter Session

Group A Courses: Foundations
 

CIN105Y1Y - Introduction to Film Study

Introduction to film analysis; concepts of film style and narrative. Topics include: documentary, avant-garde, genres, authorship, ideology, and representation.

Instructor: Benjamin Wright
Exclusion: INI115Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN201Y1Y - Film Cultures I: Art and Industry

Emergence of cinema from its start until the studio system in the first half of the 20th Century. Examines the practices, theories, and debates.

Instructor: Brian Jacobson
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Exclusion: INI212Y1, INI215Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations, 2. Thought, Belief and Behaviour

 

CIN301Y1Y - Film Cultures II: Politics and Global Media

Examines film theory and practice from the 1950s onward, and the impact of media change on earlier film cultures and aesthetics.

Instructor: Scott Richmond
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1
Exclusion: INI214Y1, INI314Y1, INI315Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations, 2. Thought, Belief and Behaviour

 
Group B Courses: Genre and Modes
 

CIN210H1F - Horror Film

This course provides students with a history of the development of the horror genre as well as a variety of theoretical frameworks through which to analyse horror texts, including those that approach the economic, technological, socio-political, and psychoanalytic dimensions of horror cinema.

Instructor: Carrie Reese
Exclusion: INI226H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN211H1S - Science Fiction Film

Science Fiction films as an international genre. Cultural and political contexts. SF film's narrative and conceptual components.

Instructor: Matt Thompson
Exclusion: INI227H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN212H1F - Cinema and Sensation I: Action/Spectacle (formerly INI222H1)
Action cinema holds a dominant place in our contemporary era of the blockbuster and CGI effects. This course examines the modes and function of this popular genre, while also tracing Action's longevity and diversity to include its significant precursors, its social contexts, and forms of spectatorship. Topics include: Adventure heroes and comic bodies; sensational serial melodramas; crazy car-chase movies; 1980s Hard Bodies and action comedies; Asian martial arts films; combat war movies; crime thrillers; and contemporary science fiction-action hybrids.

Instructor: Bart Testa
Exclusion: INI222H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN213H1S - Cinema and Sensation II: Sex (formerly INI223H1)

Whether boldly sensationalized or subdued to the point of coy indirection, the representation of sex in film has always been controversial. This course examines how sex, in the close regulation of its representation and in defiance and circumvention of such control, suggests themes and concerns tied to social mores and notions of the self, visual pleasure and the sexual body. Topics include: obscenity laws and the history of American film censorship; the emergence of sexploitation and pornography; art films’ erotic maturity, and erotic tendencies in contemporary popular cinema.

Instructor: Daniel Laurin
Exclusion: INI223H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN310Y1Y - Avant-Garde and Experimental Film (formerly INI322Y1)
Film experimentation in the context of modern art and poetry from the 1920s through the 1990s.  Influences range from Cubism and Dada-Surrealism to late-era modernism and postmodernism.

Instructor: Bart Testa
Prerequisite: CIN105Y
Exclusion: INI322Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN312Y1Y - Documentary Film (formerly INI325Y1)
Critical survey of documentary practice including newsreels, direct cinema, cinema verité, ethnographic films, and various hybrid narrative forms, with emphasis on the rhetorical, aesthetic, and political dimensions of the "art of record." Topics include: Poetics, argument, and modes of address; evidence, authenticity, and persuasion; filmmaker/subject/audience nexus; historiography, hagiography, and memory; reflexive irony and performance.

Instructor: Mike Meneghetti
Prerequisite: CIN105Y
Exclusion: INI322Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations; (3) Society and its Institutions.

 

CIN320H1S - Autobiography and Cinema

This course explores the mode of autobiographical film, and examines the questions that arise when we turn the camera on ourselves. How does cinema’s changing apparatus, from 16mm film to the YouTube vlog, allow for the personal to expand into the realm of the public? 

Instructor: Anjo-Mari Gouws
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN410H1F - Classicism Revisited: Revision & Resistance

This course will first examine some of the central tenets of Hollywood Classicism (primarily as elaborated by Bordwell, Staiger & Thompson in their 1985 book, Classical Hollywood Cinema), and then moves on to oppositional positions adopted by some scholars and refinements advanced by others, taking up issues of realism, genre, excess, and affect.  Finally, the course will examine arguments for and against post-classicism, and how the concept of classicism continues to influence recent film scholarship.

Instructor: Charlie Keil
Prerequisite:  At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

Group C: Social and Cultural Practices
 

CIN230H1S - The Business of Film

Cinema as a commercial enterprise. Production, distribution, and exhibition in the political economy of North American film culture.

Instructor: Adam Nayman
Exclusion: INI228H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities or Social Science
Breadth Requirement: 3. Society and its Institutions

 

CIN330Y1Y -  Feminist Approaches to Cinema (formerly INI323Y1)
Gender politics of feminist film culture since the 1970s.  Topics include:  Apparatus theory and its legacy, models of spectatorship, feminist historiography, stardom, the cinematic (re)production of identity, the relationship between social movements and cinema; "postfeminism."

Instructor: Corinn Columpar
Prerequisite:  CIN105Y1 or permission of the instructor.
Exclusion: INI323Y1 
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1+2 (1) Creative and Cultural Representations; (2) Thought, Belief and Behaviour

 

CIN340H1F - Black Screen Practices

In this course, we will examine the rise of new forms of critique alongside the rise of global Black screen practices, with an emphasis on the ways Black scholars engage with both dominant and emergent cinemas – to include video installation and evolving digital media and platforms. 

Instructor: Kass Banning
Prerequisite:
CIN105Y1
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN349H1Y - Screenwriting

Formerly INI388H1
Students will develop screenwriting skills under the guidance of a renowned screenwriter-in-residence through a combination of writing workshops and individual consultations. Like the course, the appointment of the Universal Screenwriter-in-Residence occurs biannually. There is an application process for this course; the deadline to apply has passed.

Instructor: Pat Mills
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, and two additional Cinema Studies full-course equivalents
Exclusion: INI388H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN430H1F - Bond, James Bond

This advanced undergraduate seminar will explore the phenomenon of the James Bond series with an emphasis on the aesthetic, economic and political dimensions of Agent 007 in literature and on screen. To do so, we will not only explore the origins of Bond in Ian Fleming's post-war spy novels but also trace the development of the character's screen persona as embodied by six different actors.

Instructor: Benjamin Wright
Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of the instructor. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN431H1S - The Revolution Will/Will Not be Televised

What were “the Sixties?” Were the 1960s a really colorful and trippy background for romantic love stories between beautiful young white people, rich in the drama of war and free love and easy drugs? (Think Across the Universe [2007].) There are plenty of movies that say the ‘60s were just that, and we’ll watch some of them. But the ‘60s (1964-1974) were more than just a paisley rebellion powered by pretty people. The decade also produced profound changes in international relations, transformed understandings about the people’s participation in social and political life, and changed (for better and for worse) relationships between the people and their governments. And the Sixties were also a time when popular media—film, radio, television, magazines, the music industry—not only reflected these upheavals, but had to decide whether to further radical change or impede it. That is, there was a media revolution as well as a cultural and political one: popular media were seen as tools for articulating politics, and as having a politics of their own. This course explores the key issues of that era—racial equality, sexual pluralism, feminism, anti-imperialism—as they were mediated, and as they involved popular media in debates over freedom, equality, and law and order. We will look at a set of cases studies that take up the tension between the mediation of politics and the politics of mediation (with a fair amount of flowers and psychedelic lighting thrown in). This course is an opportunity to make connections across media—between film and music, between music and comic books, between radio and television—and to explore the unfolding of historical change through the ways that people experienced and produced that change in their own lives.

Instructor: Nicholas Sammond
Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

Group D Courses: Theory and Criticism

 

CIN353H1S - Issues in Film Authorship II (formerly INI375H1)
Advanced study of issues in film authorship through intensive examination of one or more major filmmakers.

Instructor: Bart Testa
Prerequisite: CIN105Y
Exclusion: INI375H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN364H1F - Theories of Media
In-depth history of humanistic theories of media and mediation, with a focus on aesthetics. Covers classical (Marx, Benjamin, Freud) and contemporary (digital) theories of media. Includes extensive consideration of aesthetic forms, including animation, cinema, television, installation art, video games, net.art, and others.

Instructor: Scott Richmond
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN369H1S -  Critical Writing on Film (formerly INI384H1)
The practice of film criticism: studies of examples of journalistic and scholarly critical writing; practical sessions of process writing; and collaborative editing. Course includes regular film screenings. There is an application process for this course; the deadline to apply has passed.

Instructor: Jason Anderson
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1 and one additional Cinema Studies full-course equivalent/ permission of the instructor 
Exclusion: INI384H1
Breadth Requirement: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN450H1S - Time and the Human Condition

According to sociologist George Simmel, modern life requires that individuals conceive of their lives as organized according to an “impersonal time schedule” (1903) that replaced the circadian rhythms and chronobiological processes of agriculture-based societies. This epochal shift is accompanied by the rise of cinema, arguably the time-based medium that is most synonymous with modernity. In the late twentieth century this shift was exacerbated by the advent of personal computing; as a result, screens (from the cinema to the iPad) have become the privileged site for social interactions: as Paul Virilio noted, “The screen has become the city square” (1997), replacing live assemblies of personal, mercantile, juridical, and even religious nature. Through an examination of a variety of visual media, including painting, still photography, cinema, and internet art, this course explores how what Mary Ann Doane described as the “emergence of cinematic time” (2002) has affected our perception of the human condition. 

Instructor: Alberto Zambenedetti
Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN451H1S - Cinema And Exploration

This fourth year seminar will examine the entangled histories of cinema and exploration and the manner in which these traditions trace out and conceptualize “the world” in the era of globalization. We will examine the historical role of cinema in the documentation and imaginative depiction of encounters with the unknown territories, cultures, and phenomena, including geographic, colonial, ethnographic, and scientific explorations from the poles to equator, the deep seas to deserts, outer and inner space, and history and speculative futures. Interwoven with the examination of these traditions will be reflections on the role of moving image media as an instrument of exploration in its own right, particularly through its extensions of the human senses into “adventures in perception.”

Instructor: James Cahill
Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

Group E Courses: History and Nation
 

CIN374Y1Y   American Filmmaking in the Studio Era (formerly INI324Y1)

This course examines the American studio system (1917-1969) with an emphasis on the underlying economic, ideological, and formal features of the so-called "Golden Age of Hollywood."

Instructor: Benjamin Wright
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Exclusion: INI384H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement:1+3 (1) Creative and Cultural Representations; (3) Society and its Institutions

 

CIN376Y1Y - Chinese Cinema

Examination of Chinese films in their three post-World War II production centres: The People's Republic of China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. Commercial, political, and aesthetic trends; international reception; major auteurs and genres. Directors include Tsui Hark, Chen Kaige, Zang Yimou, Edward Yang, John Woo, and Wong Kar-Wai.

Instructor: Bart Testa
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Exclusion: INI390Y1
Recommended Preparation: 
CIN201Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN378H1F   Israeli Cinema

Focusing on the plurality and diversity of Israeli cinema, this course will examine film’s mediation of Israeli culture since the 1960s.  It will include discussion of multiple filmmakers, including Amos Gitai, Daniel Wachsmann, Michal Bat-Adam, and Michal Aviad. 

Instructor: Rachel Harris
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN379H1F    Hungarian Cinema (formerly INI378H1) 
Examines historical trends, influential filmmakers, and social and cultural factors influencing the development of Hungarian cinema, assessing its impact within the context of Eastern Europe and internationally.

Instructor: Janos Keneres
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1/ permission of instructor 
Exclusion: INI381H1/F (2010) Aspects of a National Cinema: Hungarian Cinema, INI378H1 

Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN470H1F - Theorizing Canadianicity: Place and Difference

In this course, we will explore critical and theoretical approaches to Canada’s screen cultures that transform normative conceptions of the national, with an emphasis on recent indigenous and diasporic production – to include both screen aesthetics and conditions of emergence.

Instructor: Kass Banning
Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor. A 400-Level Seminar Enrolment Form must be submitted.
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

Group F Courses: Independent Studies
 

CIN490Y1Y - Independent Studies in Cinema

See course description for CIN492H1 listed below. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN491H1F - Independent Studies in Cinema

See course description for CIN492H1 listed below. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

CIN492H1S - Independent Studies in Cinema

Independent research projects devised by students and supervised by Cinema Studies faculty. Open to advanced Specialist and Major students in the Cinema Studies Program. Submit applications to the Undergraduate Program Office: Fall 2018 courses by May 1, 2018, Winter 2019 courses by November 1, 2018, Summer 2019 courses by April 1, 2019. See Forms for application form. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: At least 10 full-course equivalents, including CIN105Y1, CIN201Y1, CIN301Y1 or permission of instructor
Distribution Requirement Status: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 
Group G Courses: Cross-Listed

Please contact the home department for more information.

 

EAS243H1F - Japanese Cinemas II: Film Form and the Problems of Modernity

This course investigates how film aesthetics relate to the most profound socio-historical problems of Japanese modernity. It also considers how various film makers employ cinematic form to engage the social problems of their moment. Part II focuses on the 1960s - present.

Day and time: Thursday 15:00-18:00
Exclusion: EAS237Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

EAS279H1S - East Asian Ecocinema

The course examines the ethical, political, historic and aesthetic dimensions of Asian Ecocinema (environmental films that engage with the Asia-based global environmental crisis) and discusses the films' ways of connecting place and planet.

Day and time: Tuesday 15:00-18:00
Prerequisite: EAS103H1/EAS105H1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

FCS310Y1Y : French Cinema

French Cinema from its origins to the present. We consider the cinema’s emergence in fin du siècle France, and major movements such as: Impressionism, Poetic Realism, Surrealism, cinéma de qualitéla nouvelle vague, and the cinéma du look. We consider some of the major French cinéastes, such as Breillat, Bresson, Carné, Clouzot, Epstein, Feuillade, Gance, Godard, Guitry, Lumière, Marker, Méliès, Ophüls, Renoir, Resnais, Truffaut, and Varda. Consideration will be given to the theoretical, political, social, aesthetic, and cultural development of French cinema and culture, and to the influence of French cinema globally. Knowledge of French is helpful but not required.

Day and time: Tuesday, 10:00-12:00, Thursday 10:00-12:00
Prerequisite: At least 5 course credits in any subject.
Recommended Preparation: INI115Y1
Distribution Requirements: Humanities
Breadth Requirements: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

FIN260H1S - Scandinavian Cinema

Major developments of cinema in Scandinavia in the 20th and 21st centuries focusing on Denmark, Sweden, and Finland. In addition to "old classics," most important recent films are screened and discussed. Film directors include Ingmar Bergman, Carl Th. Dreyer, Aki and Mika Kaurismaki, and many others. (Offered in alternate years)

Day and time: Monday 18:00-21:00
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

HIS335H1F - Soviet Cultural History

This course explores Russian culture - art, architecture, film and literature - from 1917 to the post-Soviet present. Readings and screenings trace the relation between culture, history, and revolution from the Russian Avant-Garde and proletarian culture to socialist realism, and from Krushchevs thaw to examples of Soviet postmodernism.

Day and time: Monday 17:00-20:00
Prerequisite: HIS250H1/HIS250Y1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representation

 

HIS459H1F - Soviet History and Film, 1921-1946

The history of Soviet cinema and the importance of film as a historical source. Documentary and fiction film; editing, narration, and sound; film distribution and exhibition; the Soviet school of montage and socialist realism; nationality and gender; the Soviet musical comedy of the Stalin era; resistance and dissidence.

Day and time: Tuesday 17:00-21:00
Prerequisite: CIN105Y1/HIS250Y1/HIS250H1/HIS335H1
Exclusion: HIS450Y1/SLA233H1/234H1
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representation

 

ITA240Y1Y - History of Italian Cinema

This course surveys the history of Italian cinema and the sociopolitical circumstances surrounding the film industry, from its early days to the present, while also introducing the students to methods of analysis and research appropriate to the field. Emphasis will be placed on films from the silent era to the 1960s, and from the 1960s to the present. This course includes a component designed to introduce students to methods of scholarly research appropriate to the field. The course is given in English and all films shown have English subtitles.

Day and time: Tuesday 18:00-21:30
Instructor: Alberto Zambenedetti
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

SLA226H1F - Film and Ethics: Polish Cinema

The Polish School in cinema, its predecessors and successors, their artistic accomplishments, major theoretical and thematic concerns, and their place on the map of European cinema. Films of Ford, Wajda, Polanski, Konwicki, Borowczyk, Has, Kawalerowicz, Zanussi, Kieslowski, and of the new generation of Polish film makers. Films and discussions in English. (Offered every three years)

Day and time: Tuesday 12:00-14:00
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

SLA234H1S - Russian and Soviet Cinema

A survey of the Russian cinematic tradition from its beginnings through the first decade following the disintegration of the USSR. The course examines the avant-garde cinema and film theory of the 1920s; the totalitarian esthetics of the 1920s-1940s and the ideological uses of film art; the revolution in film theory and practice in the 1950s-1960s; cinema as medium of cultural dissent and as witness to social change. Students also acquire basic skills of film analysis. Taught in English, all films subtitled in English.

Day and time: Tuesday 12:00-16:00
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations

 

SPA375H1F - Latin American Cinema

This course examines the social, political, and cultural contexts of recent Latin American cinema. Since comprehensive coverage of either the period or the range of national sources is clearly impossible, primary focus is given to recent internationally received filmic production, with more attention to Argentina and Mexico. In each case the representation of national history and identity together with the relation between cinematic production and economic and social conditions will be examined. Latin American cinema has responded to revolution, military dictatorship, the restoration of democracy, the effects of economic change on rural and urban demographics, and the marginalization of minority populations. We will also consider how a recent focus on representations of history, memory, and racialized and gendered bodies have contributed to an increase in the transnational and cosmopolitan reception of Latin American film. The course is designed for students completing a minor, major, or specialization in Spanish, as well as students from Cinema Studies and other fields.

Day and time: Wednesday, 15:00-17:00
Instructor: Eva-Lynn Jagoe
Distribution Requirement: Humanities
Breadth Requirement: 1. Creative and Cultural Representations