Digital Apocalypse? The Documentary and New Technologies

A talk by Carl Plantinga, Calvin College, presented by the Cinema Studies Institute.

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Carl Plantinga

 

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5 , 2010
1 p.m.-2 p.m.
ROOM 312, INNIS COLLEGE
2 SUSSEX AVENUE, TORONTO

(Corner of St. George and Sussex)

 

Contrary to those who see a loss of indexicality and documentary authority as a result of digital images, the most salient changes to documentary brought by digital technologies will derive from the internet.  After arguing that digital images still have authority as evidence and/or information, I trace some of the most important developments in relations between the internet and documentary, including convergence, problems of documentary identity, and new forms of internet or web documentaries. 

Carl Plantinga's Bio:

  Most of my research has at some point or another focused on the means by which photographically realistic images employ a particularly sensual means of communication. In both documentary and fiction films, the use of moving photographic images has implications for the use of images as evidence or apparent evidence (in the documentary, particularly) and the means by which filmmakers use images not only to provide information, but to elicit affect for rhetorical purposes. The use of photographically realistic images in films engages real-world perceptual processes, and from this images gain much of their power.

 

If you require special accommodations, please contact 416-978-5809 at least a day in advance. There is a wheelchair accessible entrance on Sussex, east doors.

 

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