John Walker Screening, "Passage"

Co-Sponsored by: Cinema Studies, Innis College, the Department of History, University of Toronto, and the Centre for the Study of the United States at the Munk School of Global Affairs.

Passage image

Passage

 

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2010
7 p.m.-10 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m.
INNIS TOWN HALL, INNIS COLLEGE,
2 SUSSEX AVENUE, TORONTO

 

 

Followed by a roundtable discussion with: John Walker, filmmaker; Kay Armatage: Cinema Studies Institute and Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto; Heidi Bohaker: Department of History, University of Toronto; Darrell Varga: Canada Research Chair, Contemporary Film & Media Studies, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design.

The film’s historical subject is Sir John Franklin’s doomed expedition to discover the Northwest Passage. Passage is a truly remarkable piece of historical filmmaking, a lyrical model of how to construct a historical project while showcasing both the processes of making that history, as well as the changing political stakes of a specific historical narrative over time. For its unparalleled brilliance in showcasing the historical consequences of making choices in the production of historical narrative, Passage is exemplary for the “promotion of history,” a central criteria of the Erik Barnouw Award, which was awarded to John Walker in 2009.

John Walker is one of Canada's finest directors/cinematographers working in the documentary genre, and his films have won international acclaim. From the Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television he has received seventeen nominations and awards, including the coveted Donald Brittain Award for best social/political documentary—Utshimassits: Place of the Boss; best documentary director—The Hand of Stalin; and best feature documentary—Strand—Under the Dark Cloth, a personal portrait of his mentor. His film on the Cape Breton coal miners’ choir, Men of the Deeps, won three Gemini awards.

Darrell Varga is the Canada Research Chair, Contemporary Film & Media Studies, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design in Halifax.
Kay Armatage is a Professor of Cinema Studies and Women and Gender Studies at the University of Toronto. Heidi Bohaker is Assistant Professor in the Department of History, University of Toronto.

 

Registration is encouraged via http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/Events.aspx

If you require special accommodations, please contact 416-978-5809 at least a day in advance. There is a wheelchair accessible entrance on Sussex, east doors.

 

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